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Tag: In theaters

The 10 Best Films of 2023
Features, Film, Reviews

The 10 Best Films of 2023

It's time to take a look at the best films of 2023. I managed to view over 120 new releases this year and there was a lot to love. Despite the Writers Guild and Screen Actors Guild striking this year, there was a wide array of movies to choose from. The true impact from those strikes will not likely be felt until next year, although the box office of several releases this year were likely less than they could have been due to a lack of promotion. It wasn't all doom and gloom for the overall business - 8 feature films crossed the $200 million mark in ticket sales and 'Barbie' ended up grossing over $636 million domestically. The films below weren't necessarily the biggest hits, but they are the ones that have lingered the most in my mind. Emma Stone stars in 'Poor Things,'...
Sofia Coppola Explores Love and Loss with ‘Priscilla’ (Review)
Features, Film, Reviews

Sofia Coppola Explores Love and Loss with ‘Priscilla’ (Review)

Priscilla Presley was little more than a footnote in Baz Luhrmann's 'Elvis' last year, despite being his only wife. For her eighth feature film, Sofia Coppola turns the tables and puts the focus on Priscilla's formative years. Based on the 1985 memoir Elvis and Me: The True Story of the Love Between Priscilla Presley and the King of Rock N' Roll, we are introduced to Priscilla when she is just 14. An American teenager living in Germany while her Air Force officer father was stationed there, she is lonely and homesick. Then, she meets Elvis. Already a worldwide star, Elvis was drafted into the Army and served from 1958 to 1960. He took a shine to Priscilla, but because of her age, he was cautious about going too far in their relationship. Or so we're led to believe. As they fel...
‘The Exorcist: Believer’ May Make You a Skeptic (Review)
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‘The Exorcist: Believer’ May Make You a Skeptic (Review)

With 'The Exorcist: Believer,' director David Gordon Green has taken another legacy horror series and updated it for modern times. Whether or not he has succeeded in that is debatable. I was a fan of his 2018 reboot of the 'Halloween' series, but stretching that into a new trilogy felt unnecessary. Now, the plan is for another new trilogy using the backbone of 'The Exorcist.' I gotta say, it feels like Green should stop while he's ahead. This is not to say that 'The Exorcist: Believer' is unwatchable. Far from it. The first half of the film is rather compelling. Unfortunately, things change once efforts are made to tie the new storyline into the original tale of possession from the 1973 classic. Leslie Odam Jr. is Victor, an overprotective single father raising his teenage dau...
‘Flora and Son’ Explores the Healing Power of Music (Review)
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‘Flora and Son’ Explores the Healing Power of Music (Review)

With his latest film 'Flora and Son,' Irish director John Carney continues to build on the themes that have brought him success. Over the last two decades, the former bass player for The Frames has earned raves with movies like "Once" and "Sing Street." His newest is a little more rough around the edges, but still illustrates the transformative properties of song. Flora (Eve Hewson) is a single mother living in Dublin. When it comes to luck, she just doesn't have any. Her teenage son Max (Orén Kinlan) is a problem child, but Flora isn't much better. Life has been a series of mistakes and disappointments and when she gets a warning that Max needs to clean up his act or risk serious trouble, her maternal instincts finally start to surface. After rescuing a guitar from a dumpster, she...
‘Bottoms’ is an Instant Comedy Classic (Review)
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‘Bottoms’ is an Instant Comedy Classic (Review)

While promoting her debut film 'Shiva Baby,' director Emma Seligman talked about how her next movie would be a "campy queer high school comedy in the vein of 'Wet American Summer but more for a Gen-Z queer audience." She has delivered with a wildly outrageous film called 'Bottoms.' PJ (Rachel Sennott) and Josie (Ayo Edebari) are hopelessly disliked at their high school. It's not because they are openly gay, but actually because they're "ugly and untalented." The two are desperate to lose their virginity before going off to college, but can't get any girls to look their way. That all changes once they form a "fight club" to attract the attention of some popular cheerleaders in their senior class. The unorthodox extracurricular activity brings the girls to them, but can they clos...
Longing, Loss and ‘Past Lives’ (Review)
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Longing, Loss and ‘Past Lives’ (Review)

Full disclosure: the first time I saw the trailer for 'Past Lives' in the theater, I began sobbing uncontrollably. Soundtracked by Cat Power's gorgeous cover of Rihanna's "Stay," I was instantly transfixed by the song's lyrics combined with the film's sumptuous visuals. Not really sure how to feel about itSomething in the way you moveMakes me feel like I can't live without you While the song does not appear in the actual movie, "Stay" perfectly accompanies 'Past Lives,' the first feature film from Korean-Canadian playwright and director Celine Song. It's a story so intensely personal and lived-in, that it doesn't seem possible that it is her first movie. It tells the story of Nora (Greta Lee) and Hae Sung (Teo Yoo) - two childhood friends from South Korea who fell out of touch ...
As ‘John Wick: Chapter 4’ Hits Theaters, Catch Up On The Series
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As ‘John Wick: Chapter 4’ Hits Theaters, Catch Up On The Series

If there is one thing that 'John Wick: Chapter 4' proves, it's that you can't keep a good assassin down. As Keanu Reeves and director Chad Stahelski head back to the theaters this weekend, you may be looking to catch up on the series. Or, if you're like me, you are trying to figure out how to watch most of the films for the first time so you can go enjoy the new movie on the big screen. Confession: I saw the first film back in 2015 when it hit home video. I enjoyed it, but for whatever reason never bothered to watch the rest of the movies. Until, that is, this week! I figured it was time for a crash course and it is honestly pretty fun to get watch these in quick succession. How to Watch the John Wick series In advance of the new film hitting theaters, Peacock ponied up...
The 10 Best Films of 2022
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The 10 Best Films of 2022

Despite going to the theater less than ever, I saw over 120 new release films in 2022. When it comes to the modern theatrical experience, I'm reminded of 'A Tale of Two Cities' when Dickens wrote “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." There are more opportunities than ever for premium moviegoing experiences with multiplexes adding IMAX and Dolby Cinemas across the country, but for the most part, the chain theaters are abysmal at technical presentation. Hell, many theaters aren't even screening movies on the proper sized screens. 'Nope' is one of the Best Films of 2022 (Universal Pictures) But with more and more 4K HDR offerings at home and many new releases being offered for viewing on my couch within 17 days of release, it makes it easy to watch exactly what...
‘The Greatest Beer Run Ever’ Falls Short (Review)
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‘The Greatest Beer Run Ever’ Falls Short (Review)

Peter Farrelly's follow-up to his mawkish Best Picture winner 'Green Book' is a more interesting film, but I'm not sure 'The Greatest Beer Run Ever' is a good movie. Actually, I'm quite positive that it isn't, but it is an inherently watchable one. That has everything to do with Zac Efron, who makes a rather unlikeable character surprisingly sympathetic. He plays John "Chickie" Donohue, a merchant Marine in 1967 New York City who concocts a rather ridiculous plan while out shittalking at the bar with his buddies. Zac Efron brings his buddy a PBR in 'The Greatest Beer Run Ever' (Apple TV+) From the Five Boroughs to Da Nang If this wasn't based on a true story, you'd be forgiven for thinking the plot was absurd. Chickie makes a plan to go to Vietnam and deliver cans of Pab...
‘Confess, Fletch’ is a Welcome Return (Review)
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‘Confess, Fletch’ is a Welcome Return (Review)

The character of I.M. Fletcher, aka Fletch, began with series of mystery novels released by Gregory Mcdonald starting in 1974. That original novel was adapted for the big screen in 1985 with Chevy Chase taking on the titular role of an unconventional investigative reporter. Known for his comedic prowess, Chase helped cement the character into the realm of pop culture. After an ill-fated sequel in 1989 that was not based on an existing novel, Fletch's big screen adventures ended even though there are 11 existing books in the series. There has been talk of trying a cinematic reboot for years, but it took actual decades to get off the ground. Jon Hamm stars in 'Confess, Fletch' (Paramount/Miramax) 'Confess, Fletch' is based on the second book in the series, originally published...